Saturday, May 2, 2009

2nd Ammendment Bonanza, build your own AR-15 (Part 1)

Well, with no power of filibuster and a known anti-gun President, we are probably looking at a few years of legislation against our Second Amendment Rights.

So, its time for some fun. This is the first part in a series that will teach you how to build your own AR-15 from pieces/parts. This is courtesy of an acquaintence, who is a avid 2nd Ammendment rights advocate, and also builds his own AR-15's.

Why from parts? Well, it can be done cheaper, or even incrementally--you know, if you're like me and don't have 1500 clams lying around. Anyhow, as Mr. T would say, "Enough Jibba-Jabba!", here is the article:

AR-15 Lowers

“AR-15” is the generic term used to describe the semi-automatic only version of the M-16.
The base of any AR-15 is the lower receiver. They can be bought “stripped,” without any internals, or complete and ready to attach to the upper receiver. The lower receiver is the part that is considered the firearm, even buying one without any internals requires filling out the same paperwork you would if buying any other complete shotgun or rifle. If you’re buying an AR-15 in parts to build yourself, this is the ONLY part of the gun that requires any paperwork at all.

Stripped lower:


Combined with a lower parts kit:

And a complete stock kit:

Make a complete lower, ready to combine with complete upper:

The actual model number/name could vary with manufacturer, but the lower receivers are, for all intents and purposes, interchangeable.

Uppers

Uppers can be bought in parts and put together just like lowers, but for simplicity, we’ll just look at complete uppers. Complete uppers are available in many combinations. Barrel lengths, gas systems( the location of the gas port in the barrel that routes gas back to the bolt carrier group to cycle the rifle), upper style (fixed carry handle or flattop), or sights can all vary.

Accessories make it possible to customize your AR-15 to perform a specific tasks, or to design a general all purpose firearm that can handle many situations. Rail systems make it easy to mount lights, laser, vertical foregrips, or bipods.

Optics and sights are also available in many different flavors. In addition to the original aperture sights, and the traditional magnifying scopes, many variations of non-magnifying and variable power optics are now available.

More to follow in part 2. Enjoy!

2 comments:

Old Man said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Brian said...

Oh this could get interesting

http://www.republicmagazine.com/mont...y-new-gun-law/

Executive Summary – The USA state of Montana has signed into power a revolutionary gun law. I mean REVOLUTIONARY.

The State of Montana has defied the federal government and their gun laws. This will prompt a showdown between the federal government and the State of Montana. The federal government fears citizens owning guns. They try to curtail what types of guns they can own. The gun control laws all have one common goal – confiscation of privately owned firearms.

Montana has gone beyond drawing a line in the sand. They have challenged the Federal Government. The fed now either takes them on and risks them saying the federal agents have no right to violate their state gun laws and arrest the federal agents that try to enforce the federal firearms acts. This will be a world-class event to watch. Montana could go to voting for secession from the union, which is really throwing the gauntlet in Obamas face. If the federal government does nothing they lose face. Gotta love it.
Important Points – If guns and ammunition are manufactured inside the State of Montana for sale and use inside that state then the federal firearms laws have no applicability since the federal government only has the power to control commerce across state lines. Montana has the law on their side. Since when did the USA start following their own laws especially the constitution of the USA, the very document that empowers the USA.
Silencers made in Montana and sold in Montana would be fully legal and not registered. As a note silencers were first used before the 007 movies as a device to enable one to hunt without disturbing neighbors and scaring game. They were also useful as devices to control noise when practicing so as to not disturb the neighbors.

Silencers work best with a bolt-action rifle. There is a long barrel and the chamber is closed tight so as to direct all the gases though the silencer at the tip of the barrel. Semi-auto pistols and revolvers do not really muffle the sound very well except on the silver screen. The revolvers bleed gas out with the sound all over the place. The semi-auto pistols bleed the gases out when the slide recoils back.

Silencers are maybe nice for snipers picking off enemy soldiers even though they reduce velocity but not very practical for hit men shooting pistols in crowded places. Silencers were useful tools for gun enthusiasts and hunters.
There would be no firearm registration, serial numbers, criminal records check, waiting periods or paperwork required. So in a short period of time there would be millions and millions of unregistered untraceable guns in Montana. Way to go Montana.

Discussion – Let us see what Obama does. If he hits Montana hard they will probably vote to secede from the USA. The governor of Texas has already been refusing Federal money because he does not want to agree to the conditions that go with it and he has been saying secession is a right they have as sort of a threat. Things are no longer the same with the USA. Do not be deceived by Obama acting as if all is the same, it is not.

Text of the New Law:
HOUSE BILL NO. 246
INTRODUCED BY J. BONIEK, BENNETT, BUTCHER, CURTISS, RANDALL, WARBURTON
AN ACT EXEMPTING FROM FEDERAL REGULATION UNDER THE COMMERCE CLAUSE OF THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES A FIREARM, A FIREARM ACCESSORY, OR AMMUNITION MANUFACTURED AND RETAINED IN MONTANA; AND PROVIDING AN APPLICABILITY DATE.
BE IT ENACTED BY THE LEGISLATURE OF THE STATE OF MONTANA:
Section 1. Short title. [Sections 1 through 6] may be cited as the “Montana Firearms Freedom Act”.